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CLAS 239 A: Greece: From Ancient to Modern

Meeting Time: 
TTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Location: 
* *
SLN: 
12532
Joint Sections: 
JSIS A 239 A
Instructor:
Alexander Hollmann
Alexander Hollmann

Syllabus Description:

Winter Quarter 2021
T Th, 2.30-4.20 pm via Zoom

Instructors:

Prof. Alexander Hollmann (Classics)

hollmann@uw.edu: office hours TBA & by appointment

Prof. Nektaria Klapaki (JSIS, Hellenic Studies)

nklapaki@uw.edu: office hours TBA & by appointment



Course Description

How are Ancient and Modern Greece connected to each other? Partly real and partly invented, the bond between them can simultaneously be described in terms of revival and continuity, but also in terms of discontinuity, tension, appropriation and conflict. In the first half of the course we will look at some of the most distinctive features of and moments in Ancient Greek culture: the combination of competition and collaboration that gave rise to tyranny, oligarchy, and radical democracy, tragedy and comedy, athletic competition, and a much imitated style of art and architecture; how the Greeks presented themselves for generations to come in their literature, art, and architecture and saw themselves in relation to other peoples around them. In the second half of the course we look at Modern Greece and its relationship with Ancient Hellas: how has the heritage of Ancient Greece shaped Modern Greece? How have the excavations at Knossos and Mycenae and the debate about the Parthenon marbles impacted Modern Greek identity? How have Ancient Greek drama, myth and ritual been revived and to what end? What lies behind the modern (Greek) institution of the Olympic Games? How has the ancient Greek concept of democracy been used, appropriated, and abused?

We will explore primary texts and images both ancient and modern (poetry, history, novels, painting, sculpture, photography, and film) and a wide range of secondary readings in history, archaeology, literary criticism, cultural studies, and political science. There are no prerequisites.

 

Course Learning Objectives

  • to become familiar with key features of Ancient and Modern Greek culture
  • to study Ancient and Modern Greek self-perceptions
  • to understand the ambivalent relation between modern and ancient Greece
  • to familiarize themselves with the key aspects of modern Greek identity and the ideological processes whereby they were constructed

Course components

  • Assignments (first half of course) 25%
  • Midterm assessment  25%
  • Assignments (second half of course) 25%
  • Final assessment 25%

Required Course Reading Material

  • Johanna Hanink, The Classical Debt: Greek Antiquity in an Era of Austerity(Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, 2017).
  • Other assigned readings will be available through Canvas and as handouts in the class

 

Course Policies

Please come to class prepared to participate. This includes having read the readings assigned for the day and have considered the study questions.

Please refrain from using electronic devices for anything other than taking notes in class.

Please do not leave the classroom during the class except if absolutely necessary. A break will be provided half-way through the class.

All Powerpoint presentations shown in class will be posted on the website but please note that these are only outlines and not a substitute for notes. If you miss a class, please get notes from another student.

If you cannot take a quiz or an exam because of illness or a personal or family emergency please let us know as soon as possible and a make-up may be arranged.

 

Grade scale

The following grade scale will be used to convert percentages to GPA points

 

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

74

2.1

100-95

4.0

73

2.0

94

3.9

72

1.9

93

3.8

71

1.8

92

3.7

70

1.7

91

3.6

69

1.6

90-89

3.5

68

1.5

88-87

3.4

67

1.4

86

3.3

66

1.3

85

3.2

65

1.2

84

3.1

64

1.1

83

3.0

63

1.0

82

2.9

62

0.9

81

2.8

61

0.8

80

2.7

60

0.7

79

2.6

59 and x < 59

0.0

78

2.5

 

 

77

2.4

 

 

76

2.3

 

 

75

2.2

 

 

Catalog Description: 
How are Ancient and Modern Greece connected to each other? Learn about great moments in Ancient Greek culture (tyranny and democracy, tragedy and comedy, athletics and art) and the complex ways Modern Greece has drawn on this heritage by exploring ancient and modern texts and images. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 239.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 20, 2020 - 9:12pm
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