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LATIN 300 A: Introductory Latin, Accelerated

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Summer Term: 
A-term
Meeting Time: 
MTWThF 9:30am - 11:40am
Location: 
* *
SLN: 
11883
Instructor:
Joseph Bringman Photo
Joseph E. Bringman

Syllabus Description:

LATIN 300 A Summer 2024: Introductory Latin, Accelerated

Mon-Fri 9:30-11:40 AM, on Zoom

Instructor: Dr. Joseph Bringman

Email: bringj@uw.edu

Office Hours (via Zoom): Fridays 3:00-4:00 PM or by appointment

Summer Latin courses give you direct access to the thoughts and writings of the ancient Romans and allow you to explore the dynamic and often dangerous cultural, social and political world in which they wrote. Learning to interpret and use an ancient language requires you to explore unknown areas and think in new ways. Our focus is on Latin as a literary language. Course activities are designed to foster a collegial and collaborative atmosphere and to encourage you to make strong connections between the ancient language and literature we are exploring together and your other interests, passions and pursuits. In Latin 300 (Summer Term A) you will cover roughly half of the textbook and in Latin 103 (Summer Term B) you will cover the remaining half.

This course counts for A&H if you are not using it to meet the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Course Goals:

Through your work in the course this term you will demonstrate that you can: 

  •         Read and translate short selections from ancient Roman authors and compose simple sentences in Latin
  •         Understand and explain the literary, historical and cultural context of texts by ancient Roman authors
  •         Analyze and explain Latin grammar and syntax
  •         Analyze and describe the influence of the Latin language on subsequent languages and literatures

By completing the summer sequence you equip yourself to read any Latin author. In our second year courses (304, 305, 306, 307) students read selections of Caesar, Horace, Catullus (305), Cicero and Ovid (306), and Virgil (307), and other authors (304). 

Required textbook:

  • Wheelock's Latin. (7th ed.) This book explains Latin grammar and syntax and contains many short readings from ancient Roman authors and many practice exercises.
  • Thirty-Eight Latin Stories (5th ed.) This book includes stories for translation.
  • Free on-line Latin dictionary: http://logeion.uchicago.edu/

Class Policies

Our class will meet via Zoom at the scheduled time.  If you are unable to attend class during our Zoom session, you will want to follow along by using the Powerpoints uploaded under Files.

I cannot discuss grades during class or via e-mail due to university policy, but only during office hours and by appointment.  If a student has questions regarding assessments, homework or any other matter, I will be more than happy to discuss that during office hours via Zoom.  All email correspondence should be polite, professional and should include LAT300 in the subject line.

Grade Scale

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

100-95

4.0

74

2.1

94

3.9

73

2.0

93

3.8

72

1.9

92

3.7

71

1.8

91

3.6

70

1.7

90-89

3.5

69

1.6

88-87

3.4

68

1.5

86

3.3

67

1.4

85

3.2

66

1.3

84

3.1

65

1.2

83

3.0

64

1.1

82

2.9

63

1.0

81

2.8

62

0.9

80

2.7

61

0.8

79

2.6

60

0.7

78

2.5

59 and x < 59

0.0

77

2.4

 

 

76

2.3

 

 

75

2.2

 

 

Grading:

Grades will be calculated on the basis of the following percentages: 

Homework assignments and in-class exercises                                               40% 

Canvas assessments                                                                                           40% 

Final translation project                                                                                     20% 

Homework:  There will be daily homework assignments, drawn from Wheelock, which will be graded on their completion.  You will submit the homework on Canvas before class on the day they are due.  In addition to the homework, I will also ask you to upload scans of whatever vocabulary study material (e.g. flashcards) you are using so that I can know you are keeping up with the vocabulary.

Weekly Assessments: These Assessments will test the skills that we introduced and practiced this week, as well as the weekly readings and the grammar review. They will become available every week under Quizzes on Friday immediately after class and are due on Saturday at 5pm.

  • Each assessment is worth 10% of your grade.
  • You may use your textbook and class notes, but no other resources. (Do not be led astray by searching the internet!)
  • The aim of these assessments is to help keep you focused and motivated to practice and master the weekly material.

Final Translation Project: This will be an open book translation of a short Latin passage.  It will be due on July 17th by 11:59pm, to be submitted on Canvas under Assignments.  The aim of this project is to give you practice translating from Latin into English.

How to Succeed in This Class:

  • Daily practice: As with any language, the single most important thing you can do is practice daily. This includes memorization of vocabulary and forms, and translation. Every little bit counts!
  • Attend class daily: This is probably the best thing you can do to succeed in this or any class.
  • Complete assigned exercises by the date listed on the syllabus.
  • Attempt all assigned exercises, even if – especially if – you are unsure of you answers, and bring questions to class. This ensures that you have the instructor’s help while the material is fresh in your mind.
  • Make mistakes! Learning a new language is a messy process; embrace your mistakes and accept them as part of the journey.

Important UW policy-related things to know:

UW’s Religious Accommodations Policy: “Washington state law requires that UW develop a policy for accommodation of student absences or significant hardship due to reasons of faith or conscience, or for organized religious activities. The UW’s policy, including more information about how to request an accommodation, is available at Religious Accommodations Policy (https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/). Accommodations must be requested within the first two weeks of this course using https://registrar.washington.edu/students/religious-accommodations-request/ , the Religious Accommodations Request form.”

UW’s Student Conduct Code: “The University of Washington Student Conduct Code (WAC 478-121) defines prohibited academic and behavioral conduct and describes how the University holds students accountable as they pursue their academic goals. Allegations of misconduct by students may be referred to the appropriate campus office for investigation and resolution. More information can be found online at https://www.washington.edu/studentconduct/

UW Disability Resources: Access and Accommodations: Your experience in this class is important to me. If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me at your earliest convenience so we can discuss your needs in this course.

If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.

Academic Integrity: University of Washington students are expected to practice high standards of academic and professional honesty and integrity as outlined here: https://www.washington.edu/cssc/for-students/academic-misconduct/

Catalog Description: 
Intensive introduction to classical Latin. Not accepted as upper-division credit toward a major in Latin or classics. Does not satisfy foreign language proficiency requirement. Cannot be taken for credit if credit received for LATIN 101. Offered: WS.
GE Requirements: 
Arts and Humanities (A&H)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 19, 2024 - 3:10pm
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