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CLAS 445 A: Greek and Roman Religion

Meeting Time: 
MW 10:30am - 12:20pm
Location: 
ECE 045
SLN: 
12276
Joint Sections: 
RELIG 445 A
Instructor:
Alexander Hollmann
Alexander Hollmann

Syllabus Description:

Spring 2019M W10.30-12.20 pm ECE 45

Prof. Hollmann (hollmann@u.washington.edu).

Office: Denny M262E, office hour W 1-2 or by appointment

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND AIMS

A theme-based introduction to the religions of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Using primary texts and images and some secondary literature we will explore how each of the religions approaches the following: polytheism, gods and heroes, the dead and the underworld, animal sacrifice, offerings and libations, prayer, priesthood, sanctuaries and place, festivals and calendars, mystery cult, divination, magic. By the end of the course students should have a good sense of these categories and the structure of the religions, how we know what we know about them, and how to approach and interpret primary sources.

CLASS STRUCTURE

Each class will be structured around a theme and will generally involve a formal presentation from me for part of the time, but with plenty of opportunity for questions from students and discussion before, during, and after. I ask students to submit to the course discussion board questions or observations they have about the material and readings for that session, or I will pose questions for students to think about individually or in groups during class. Readings are drawn from the four prescribed books, with extra readings assigned from time to time. These additional readings will always be posted electronically on the course's website, along with any images and texts presented in class (these will appear as PowerPoint presentations). Students will submit two brief written assignments (see date on course schedule, assignment will be posted on the website), and write a final examination (on material covered from beginning of the course to the end).

TEXTBOOKS

 

Author

Title/Course Materials

ISBN/SKU

Edition

Year

Publisher

Req. or Opt.

Enrollment

1

Price, Simon

Religions Of The Ancient Greeks

0521388678

1999

Cup

Required

60

2

Scheid, John

An Introduction To Roman Religion

0253216605

2003

Indiana Up

Required

60

3

Warrior, Valerie

Greek Religion: A Sourcebook

1585100315

2009

Focus Publishing

Required

60

4

Warrior, Valerie

Roman Religion: A Sourcebook

1585100307

2002

Focus Publishing

Required

60

 

COURSE COMPONENTS

Class participation (10%): Based on student participation in questions and discussion in class as well as submission of questions and comment to the class discussion board.

Writing assignments (30%, 15% each, due April 10 and May 22): Written responses to a set of specific questions, 2-3 pages, which will then be discussed in class the day on which they are due.

Midterm examination (30%, M May 6, in class): brief definitions of terms or names, identification and discussion of short passages from primary sources or images

Final examination (30%, M June 10, 8.30-10.20 am, usual classroom): similar to midterm, covers material after the midterm (not cumulative).

EXTRA CREDIT

Please note I do not offer extra assignments for credit.

SCHEDULE OF READINGS

Please consult the Canvas website https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/1272750for reading assignments for each class meeting. I expect you to come to class having read the assigned readings for that day. I encourage enrolled for credit students to submit questions via the course discussion board and to ask questions in class.

GRADING SCALE

I use the following scale for converting percentage points to GPA

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

74

2.1

100-95

4.0

73

2.0

94

3.9

72

1.9

93

3.8

71

1.8

92

3.7

70

1.7

91

3.6

69

1.6

90-89

3.5

68

1.5

88-87

3.4

67

1.4

86

3.3

66

1.3

85

3.2

65

1.2

84

3.1

64

1.1

83

3.0

63

1.0

82

2.9

62

0.9

81

2.8

61

0.8

80

2.7

60

0.7

79

2.6

59 and x < 59

0.0

78

2.5

 

 

77

2.4

 

 

76

2.3

 

 

75

2.2

 

 

 

 

Further Expectations:

  • In class
    • In order to maximize your learning potential and prevent distraction to others, I ask that you use electronic devices only for class-related purposes.
    • You are responsible for all materials assigned in the readings and covered in lectures. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to get notes from a classmate.
      • The University of Washington prohibits the selling of notes online or through any other channels.
    • No audio or visual recording of class is permitted without my written authorization. If you would like to record the class, please stop by office hours to chat with me first.
    • No posting of course materials of any kind is permitted without my written authorization.
  • Getting in touch with each other
    • Please check your uw email daily; this is how I will communicate with you about pertinent information (such as when study guides are posted, or if class needs to be cancelled for some reason). You are responsible for all information disseminated over email and through the course website.
    • I hold office hours for you! I am happy to chat with enrolled for credit students about class (including any concerns you may have). If you would like to chat but can’t make it to scheduled office hours, just email me and we can find a time to meet.
  • Grading
    • Students are expected to adhere to ethical behavior in their work, including following guidelines posted for each exam concerning group work and plagiarism/cheating.
    • Make-up exams will be given only in the case of illness or emergency, or for university-approved events (athletics, etc.) that are cleared with me in advance.
    • I’d be happy to discuss any of your graded work with you, but I ask that you wait twenty-four hours after receiving your exam back in order to begin to process my feedback. After the twenty-four-hour period, please feel free to email me to set up a time to meet. Unfortunately, I cannot discuss grades over email.

 

Catalog Description: 
Religion in the social life of the Greeks and Romans, with emphasis placed on their public rituals and festivals. Attention is given to the priesthoods, personal piety, rituals of purification and healing, and the conflict of religions in the early Roman Empire. Many lectures illustrated by slides. Offered: jointly with RELIG 445.
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
January 24, 2019 - 2:00am
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