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GREEK 461 A: Early Greek Literature

Herodotus

Herodotus
Meeting Time: 
MW 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Location: 
MUS 212
SLN: 
15808
Instructor:
Alexander Hollmann
Alexander Hollmann

Syllabus Description:

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Story-teller, ethnographer, geographer, natural scientist—and historian!—Herodotus is the earliest Greek prose writer whose complete work we still have. The Histories provide a fascinating look into the world of Greeks and barbaroi (Lydians, Persians, Thracians, Egyptians, and Scythians among others) in the archaic and early classical periods. Known for his charm, humanity, and fascinating narrative, Herodotus is often our best or only source for this period and for these peoples. We will read selections from Book One, one of the longest and most varied books in the work. NOTE: we will be reading in the original language, so knowledge of Ancient Greek is required for this course. Please email hollmann@uw.edu if you have questions about eligibility or anything else.

Autumn 2019

MUS 212, MW 2.30-4.20

Prof. Alexander Hollmann (hollmann@u.washington.edu)

Office: Denny 262E

Office hours: MW 12.30-1.30 and by appointment

Aims

We will read selections in Greek from Book 1 of the Histories. The aim is familiarity with the language and style of Herodotus in Greek and, more generally, familiarity with the work as a whole and Herodotus' methods and interests.

 

Course components

participation                                                             20%

class presentation                                                   5%

response paper   (due M Oct. 21)                     10%

midterm examination (M Oct. 28)                  30%

final examination (T Dec. 10, 2.30-4.20)    35%

 

-Participation: defined as being an active presence in the classroom.  This necessarily involves being physically present in class and also being prepared to translate and engage in the class.  Quality of preparation and translation is also included in this grade. Being prepared means having used all resources at your disposal (lexicon, grammar, commentary) to the best of your ability.

-Class presentation: a brief (no more than 10 min.) presentation of an overview of one or more of the other books of the Histories (i.e. books 2-8),

-Response paper: brief, 2-3 page paper written in response to questions comparing a part of the Historieswith another ancient Greek text. Choice of two options (Herodotus and Plato, Herodotus and Pindar).

 

Grade scale

The following grade scale will be used:

 

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

100-95

4.0

74

2.1

94

3.9

73

2.0

93

3.8

72

1.9

92

3.7

71

1.8

91

3.6

70

1.7

90-89

3.5

69

1.6

88-87

3.4

68

1.5

86

3.3

67

1.4

85

3.2

66

1.3

84

3.1

65

1.2

83

3.0

64

1.1

82

2.9

63

1.0

81

2.8

62

0.9

80

2.7

61

0.8

79

2.6

60

0.7

78

2.5

59 and x < 59

0.0

77

2.4

 

 

76

2.3

 

 

75

2.2

 

 

 

Absence, make-ups

Make-ups can be given for absences caused by illness, family emergency, or religious observance. For accommodation of absence due to the latter, please consult https://registrar.washington.edu/staffandfaculty/religious-accommodations-policy/.

 

Required text

Geoffrey Steadman, Herodotus’ Histories Book 1.

[ You may also use: George A. Sheets, Herodotus Book 1. Bryn Mawr commentaries. This will give you a little less help than Steadman, but has commentary that ventures beyond merely helping you translate.]

 

Helpful tools

Lexicon

  1. E. Powell, A Lexicon to Herodotus. 1938, reprinted 1971. Out of print, but very useful to have – makes the looking-up process much easier (if you’re not using Steadman). In seminar room (REF PA 4007 .Z8 1960).

Commentaries

David Asheri, Alan B. Lloyd, Aldo Corcella, A Commentary on Herodotus I-IV.   Edited by Oswyn Murray and Alfonso Moreno. Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2007. The most up-to-date comprehensive commentary on the first four books of Herodotus and well-worth consulting. In seminar room (PA 4004 .H6 2007)

How and Wells. The only complete commentary in English, useful on some things, but dated in terms of archaeological and linguistic discoveries and interpretative approaches. In seminar room (PA 4004 .H6 v.1 1961, PA 4004 .H6 v.2 1957), also online through Perseus (see below).

McKean,Herodotus Book 1.  Edition of Greek text, with brief notes at back, useful for translation help.  In seminar room (PA 4002 .A31 1986).

Translation

Robin Waterfield (trans.), HerodotusHistories. OUP.  Intro. and notes by Carolyn Dewald. The translation I recommend. De Selincourt, rev. by Marincola with introduction and notes, is also good. The Loeb edition of Herodotus has translation by Godley, which is a little oldfashioned. Feel free to use other translations.

Recent introductions, collections, and general studies

Bakker, De Jong, Van Wees (eds), Brill's Companion to Herodotus. Leiden 2002. Essays on various aspects of H. by various scholars.  Good bibliography.

Dewald, Marincola (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Herodotus. In seminar room (PA 4004 .C36 2006).

  1. Luraghi (ed.), The Historian's Craft in the Age of Herodotus. Oxford 2001.
  2. Thomas, Herodotus in context: ethnography, science, and the art of persuasion. Cambridge, 2000.
  3. Harrison, Divinity and History: The Religion of Herodotus. Oxford 2000.
  4. Lateiner, The Historical Method of Herodotus. U. of Toronto Press 1989.
  5. Dewald, J. Marincola, "A Selective Introduction to Herodotean Studies." Arethusa20 (1987) 9-40.

Electronic resources

www.perseus.tufts.eduhas an electronic Greek and English texts of Herodotos.  Greek text has syntactical and lexical look-up feature.  Also contains How and Wells' commentary on Herodotos.

www.isidore-of-seville.com/herodotusgathers some useful links, but use with caution.

 

Selections from Book 1

This represents what I would like to read from Book 1, but this will depend on the pace of the class.

 

 

 

Oxford pages

1.1-5

Proem

 

3

1.6-12

Gyges and Kandaules

 

3.5

1.29-33

Solon and Kroisos 1

4

1.34-45

Atys and Adrastos

4.5

1.46-49, 1.55-56.1

Kroisos and oracles

 

2

1.59-64

Athens

 

4

1.65-70

Sparta

 

4

1.86-91

Solon & Kroisos 2

 

5

*[1.107-130

Rise of Kyros

 

15]

*[1.131-140

Persian nomoi

 

4]

1.204-216

Massagetai campaign, Kyros' death

7

 

 

 

56

*Brackets ([ ])]around selections indicate that these will be dropped if we do not have time to read them together in class.

Schedule

Subject to change depending on pace of class. I will announce readings on a week-by-week basis. Students are responsible for keeping up with changes by listening to announcements in class or checking email.

 

Week 1

W Sept. 25

 

 

Week 2

M Sept. 30                                                                   

W Oct. 2

 

Week 3

M Oct. 7 Presentation 1

W Oct. 9

 

Week 4

M Oct. 14 Presentation 2                                    

W Oct. 16

 

Week 5

M Oct. 21 Response paper due in class

  1. Oct. 23

 

Week 6

M Oct. 28 Midterm examination                 

W Oct. 30              

 

Week 7

M Nov. 4 Presentation 3

W Nov. 6

                                   

Week 8

M Nov. 11 NO CLASS: Veterans Day

W Nov. 13 Presentation 4

                                   

 

Week 9

M Nov. 18 Presentation 5

W Nov. 20             

 

Week 10

M Nov. 25 Presentation 6

W Nov. 27             

                 

Week 11

M Dec. 2 Presentation 7

W Dec. 4                

 

TUESDAY Dec.10 Final examination, 2.30-4.20 pm, MUS 212

 

Catalog Description: 
Readings and discussion of selected authors of the early Greek period.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
August 2, 2019 - 9:12pm
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