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GREEK 101 A: Introductory Greek

Meeting Time: 
MTWThF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Location: 
DEM 124
SLN: 
15652
Instructor:
Catherine M. Connors
Note: 
Counts for VLPA if it is not being used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement

Syllabus Description:

GREEK 101: FIRST YEAR GREEK   Fall 2016 (Syllabus updated Sept 28, 2016) 

Monday-Friday 1:30-2:20, Dempsey 124

Catherine Connors              cconnors@u.washington.edu                     Denny 262

Dept. of Classics phone: 206 543-2266

Office hour:  M 11:30-am-12:30 pm, Thu 2:30-3:30

 Please note, due to an unforeseen family issue I must be away from Seattle on Sept 29 and 30 and so class will not meet on those days. Please try to learn the Greek alphabet and make a start on the readings and assignments listed for those days on the syllabus below. 

First year Ancient Greek courses give you direct access to the thoughts and writings of the ancient Greeks and allow you to explore the dynamic and often dangerous cultural, social and political world in which they wrote. Learning to interpret and use an ancient language requires you to explore unknown areas and think in new ways. Our focus is on Greek as a literary language. Course activities are designed to foster a collegial and collaborative atmosphere and to encourage you to make strong connections between the ancient language and literature we are exploring together and your other interests, passions and pursuits.

 Course Goals:

Through your work in the course you will demonstrate that you can: 

  • Read and translate selections from ancient Greek authors and compose simple sentences in Greek.
  • Understand and explain the literary, historical and cultural context of texts by ancient Greek authors
  • Analyze and explain Greek grammar and syntax
  • Analyze and describe the influence of the Greek language on subsequent languages and literatures

By completing the first year sequence (101-102-103) you equip yourself to read any Greek author. In our second year courses (304, 305, 306, 307) students read selections of Xenophon (305), Plato (306), and Homer (307), and other authors (304).

 

Required texts

Anne Groton: From Alpha to Omega (abbreviated as ΑΩ in what follows)

  1. Only the fourth edition should be used. This book explains Greek grammar and syntax and contains many short readings from ancient Greek authors.

Author spotlight: materials – will be distributed in class

recommended free on-line Greek dictionary: http://logeion.uchicago.edu/

 

Grades will be calculated on the basis of the following percentages:

completion of homework assignments and in-class exercises             20%

Homework includes weekly exercises in which you compose sentences in Greek; your ‘author spotlight’ presentation, and other assignments as noted on the syllabus or distributed during the term

three quizzes    (Mondays of weeks 3, 6 and 8: Oct 10, Oct 31, Nov 14) 50%

final exam                                                                                            30%

 

Course overview: In the first quarter of Greek we focus on the authors who wrote in Classical Athens during the 5th and 4th centures BCE. Each student in the class will be assigned one Author spotlight report: your job will be to present a concise 5-7 minute ‘pitch’ that introduces your author and his influence on later literature (or aspects of that author, if multiple students present on the same day) to the class in a compelling way, and to lead the discussion of a few short passages in Greek. I will be asking you to sign up for a slot for your author spotlight presentation during the second half of the term. Questions about author spotlight materials will be included on quizzes and the final exam.

 

Course schedule and homework assignments for the first part of the term.

In this term we will aim to work through each 18 Lessons of the 50 Lessons in the textbook. There is a great deal of information in each Lesson, and as we go along it is good if you can start to get familiar with that material before class. During class I will try to help you see clearly what is most important to master about each Lesson and we should usually have some time to work on memorizing new material and start the homework assignment in class. Each paragraph in the book has its own number, and I use these numbers to direct you to the homework assignments.

 

 

What we do in class -- it is beneficial to look at this in advance, but don't be overwhelmed by the amount of detail.

Homework (by paragraph number) assigned to prepare for next class. Homework should be written out and kept in a well organized notebook or folder to aid you in reviewing for quizzes.

W

Sept 28

Introduction. The Greek Alphabet

practice the alphabet

 

Th

Sept 29

ΑΩ Lesson 1: The alphabet

10 A and B

F

Sept 30

ΑΩ Lesson 2: The accents

16 A and

try B but don't agonize

 

 

 

 

M

Oct 3

ΑΩ Lesson 3: verbs

person, number, tense, mood, voice, aspect, time.

24 write out and study vocabulary

25 exercises

T

Oct 4

ΑΩ Lesson 4 first decl fem nouns

30 write out and memorize the definite article feminine forms

32 write out and study vocabulary

33 exercises

W

Oct 5

ΑΩ Lesson 5 first decl fem nouns

34 write out and study the forms

36 write out and study the vocab

37 exercises  

Th

Oct 6

ΑΩ Lesson 5 Aesop reading p. 30

study for quiz 1

F

Oct 7

Review

 

 

 

 

 

M

Oct 10

Quiz 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fun homework in Week 8 using the Artstor database, locate an image that is relevant to your interest in ancient Greece or the reception of Greek literature. As a caption for the image compose 5 sentences in Greek.

 

 

All quizzes and the final are cumulative.  They will include passages for translation, grammatical analysis, and literary and cultural commentary, and questions on the author spotlight materials.

 

 

Access and Accommodations:  Your experience in this class is important to me. If you have already established accommodations with Disability Resources for Students (DRS), please communicate your approved accommodations to me so we can discuss your needs in this course. If you have not yet established services through DRS, but have a temporary health condition or permanent disability that requires accommodations (conditions include but not limited to; mental health, attention-related, learning, vision, hearing, physical or health impacts), you are welcome to contact DRS at 206-543-8924 or uwdrs@uw.edu or disability.uw.edu. DRS offers resources and coordinates reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities and/or temporary health conditions.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and DRS.  It is the policy and practice of the University of Washington to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.

Grade Scale

Percentage Earned 

Grade-Point Equivalent

74

2.1

100-95

4.0

73

2.0

94

3.9

72

1.9

93

3.8

71

1.8

92

3.7

70

1.7

91

3.6

69

1.6

90-89

3.5

68

1.5

88-87

3.4

67

1.4

86

3.3

66

1.3

85

3.2

65

1.2

84

3.1

64

1.1

83

3.0

63

1.0

82

2.9

62

0.9

81

2.8

61

0.8

80

2.7

60

0.7

79

2.6

59 and x < 59

0.0

 

 

 

Learn more about majoring or minoring in Classics, Classical Studies, Greek or Latin, and about our excellent study abroad program in Rome, open to all students and offered every spring quarter. 

 Please contact clasdept@uw.edu if you have questions about registering for this course or other matters related to your interest in studying Ancient Greece and /or Rome and we will be happy to help you! 

muse holding a scroll.jpg

 

Additional Details:

First year ancient Greek courses give you direct access to the thoughts and writings of the ancient Greeks and allow you to explore the dynamic and often dangerous cultural, social and political world in which they wrote. Learning to interpret and use an ancient language requires you to explore unknown areas and think in new ways. Our focus is on Greek as a literary language. Course activities are designed to foster a collegial and collaborative atmosphere and to encourage you to make strong connections between the ancient language and literature we are exploring together and your other interests, passions and pursuits.

Comments from recent UW students in this class: 

"This class helped me understand language in a way I never thought I could." 

"I learned a lot and of all the language courses I have taken, this was the most useful and everything stuck." 

"I really enjoy learning Greek." 

"Greek is a blast!! I love learning about the culture." 

"Greek as a whole makes you think about the evolution of language and how much (and how little!) has changed in so many years." 

Catalog Description: 
An intensive study of grammar, with reading and writing of simple Attic prose. First in a sequence of three. Offered: A.
GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Credits: 
5
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:02pm
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